Film Review at RedFence: Django Unchained

My review of the film Django Unchained is up over at RedFenceProject.com:

Django Unchained, the latest from director Quentin Tarantino, self-consciously incorporates the classic tropes of a Spaghetti Western with a brash flair of action-flick attitude that refuses to fall completely into our traditional expectations for the genre. We’re familiar with the opening credits in bright yellow font, shoot-’em-up gunfights, Western territories scenery, and campy zoom-in shots at the arrival of new characters, but the final product is unlike any Western I’ve ever seen.

As a prime example, a song with hip-hop elements showed up midway through the eclectic soundtrack, which on the whole tends to draw from Western roots, but puts off a modern vibe at times. Given that the hip-hop jam played as a newly purchased batch of slaves made the long walk to “Candyland,” a plantation home, it felt oddly fitting.

Django treats the subjects of racism and slavery with a brutal yet often comedic irreverence. When Django (Jamie Foxx) and Dr. Schultz (Christoph Waltz) visit a plantation in search of the Brittle brothers, the owner tries to explain to one of his slaves that she isn’t to treat Django like a normal black slave, but he can’t bring himself to simply say that he should be treated like a white man. In another excellent scene (featuring a delightful appearance by Jonah Hill), a band of pre-KKK raiders gather before an attack, only to find that the holes in their hoods are too small to see through. The whole thing is nearly called off until their leader stubbornly demands they go through with it: “Did I say we ain’t wearing bags? It’s a raid! Who cares if you can see! Can the horses see!? That’s all that matters!” Through it all we can’t help but laugh at how sick and twisted the whole business is.

(to continue reading, please click here)

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Book Review: Meaning at the Movies

I’m sure many of my readers will agree that Christian books about movies–and culture in general–are a dime a dozen. Especially now, with all of the blog posts and sermons that evangelical Christians have delivered on the subject over the years, few bring much to the table. Professor Grant Horner of The Master’s College, with his humble contribution, “Meaning at the Movies,” realizes this. He takes a different tack toward movies by trying mainly to help readers understand and appreciate films in light of what the Bible says about being human.

And he succeeds.

“Meaning at the Movies” stands out because of a simple, yet powerful, thesis. Horner builds his book on the notion that culture, and especially the arts, are fundamentally a result of mankind suppressing the truth of God. As he says, “We all know, deep down, certain things, and we all, deep down, have certain expectations about the world and the ways we think things ought to be.” Some things, Horner would say, we know and refuse to disbelieve, other things we know and refuse to believe, but in either case, certain truths about ourselves, as image bearers of God, tends to come up in the movies we make.

This happens because mankind was made to be in relationship with God and worship Him, Horner says, yet we have sinned and fallen away from God. The result is that we are left seeking to fill a void in our souls. His key support for this comes from the first chapter of the book of Romans. Verses 16 through 23 in particular are worth quoting here, where St. Paul writes:

For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith for faith, as it is written, “The righteous shall live by faith.”

For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth. For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them. For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse. For although they knew God, they did not honor him as God or give thanks to him, but they became futile in their thinking, and their foolish hearts were darkened. Claiming to be wise, they became fools, and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images resembling mortal man and birds and animals and creeping things.

This is a direct, open, evangelical approach rooted in the Bible. Horner believes that the Bible is God’s word and therefore the only pure truth we have. As divine revelation, we can trust what it says about God and about humanity. Therefore, it ought to shape the very fabric of how we think about and analyze film.

As “common” as this approach may be–pretty much every Christian book on movies would purport to go by “biblical principles”–the idea of suppressed truth that Horner appeals to over and over again throughout his book strikes me as pretty unique. Horner isn’t out to say which movies are good and which ones are bad. He’s not out to give us a guide to what we should and shouldn’t watch, even though he does have a sizable section on discernment. Rather, he’s out to teach us a radical theory about human nature and cultural production.

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Welcome to the Blog

Welcome to ACwords! This is my second attempt at blogging. My first try had its highs and lows, but mostly lows. I never achieved much of a readership besides a handful of friends and family members. I posted inconsistently and, last summer, decided to completely abandoned the whole thing.

So here’s the goal this time around. I want to post my own original content at least once by the Sunday of every week. I think that’s reasonable: one post a week that I write myself. I will also occasionally post links that catch my eye, maybe offer a bit of commentary on things, etc. Substantial posts of my own work will center on personal philosophical/theological musings, art analysis and criticism like film and music reviews, political commentary, criticism of news coverage, perhaps the occasional poem or short story, and whatever else inspires me.

This blog will not be another one of those public diaries where I post things like insignificant personal ramblings or pictures of me and friends. Hopefully, it will be a place for intelligent commentary and conversation. After a few months, I want this to have developed into something that I can use for my portfolio.

I also plan to repost some of my work on the (hopefully) rare week that I can’t get something of my own up. I wrote a few decent pieces at my old blog as well a some things for school that may end up resurfacing here.

It will probably help you to get an idea of where I’m coming from personally. I’m a Christian, sometimes a bitter, confused and cynical one, but a Christian nonetheless. I struggle with my faith, I have doubts, and I make lots and lots of mistakes. My core beliefs are rooted in the Bible. I’ve been influence quite a bit by people like C.S. Lewis, John Calvin, Charles Spurgeon, Timothy Keller, and Albert Mohler (among others). But I also want to be a writer and a thinker in the public square. I’d like to be a journalist, teacher, and perhaps even screenwriter eventually. My concern in this regard is with the truth and understanding how the world works. I believe I can bring all subjects under the Lordship of Christ without necessarily bringing in the Bible or any explicit mention of God.

Understand, though, that all that “religious” stuff will come up eventually because I care more what God thinks of my writing than anyone else. I just don’t want to be that one-sided, fundamentalist Christian metaphorically beating people over the head with a “Jesus brick.”